Riding it Up at the Windsor Fair in Maine

Model View of the Windsor Fair

Today’s post was written by Lori, Andrew’s wife and travel companion.

Lori on the Swings at the Windsor Fair in MaineFor most people, county fairs are probably one of those things you either love or hate. Going on that scale, I’d have to say I love them. It’s got just the right amount of variety and excitement for me. From the food to the rides to the garden displays to the livestock barns (of course!), it wouldn’t feel like the complete fair experience to not see them all.

Although it was on the smaller scale, the Windsor Fair in Windsor, Maine (of all places) did not disappoint. One of the first things Andrew and I did was buy enough tickets to get us on three rides (we each chose one and mutually agreed that we had to ride on the Ferris Wheel as the third). For me there was really no question which ride I would pick. It had to be my childhood favorite “the swings”. After a little debate, Andrew selected “the hang-glider” which is pretty much the lying down version of the swings.

Sadly, I can’t report that our fun expectations were completely met. Although we really wanted to have a good time, our adult bodies just weren’t up to the task of being spun round and round and up and down. Neither of us lost our lunch, but we both ended up with a strange headache that lasted until evening.

The Ferris Wheel on the other hand was not only pleasant to ride but gave us a great view of the whole fair. Andrew took a picture of that view (the lead image of this post) and attempted to create a “tilt shift” effect in Photoshop. A “tilt shift” is supposed to make a real-life scene look like a miniature model. Although the concept seemed simple enough, the execution proved to be time-consuming. How do you think Andrew’s efforts turned out? If you have any tips please leave them in the comments!

Windsor Fair Swings in Maine Windsor Fair Swings in Maine

Windsor Fair Swings in Maine

Windsor Fair in Maine Food Booth

Windsor Fair in Maine Sweet Potato FriesOnce our ride tickets had been exhausted, the next step for our day at the Windsor fair was to take a stroll through the food alley. Even though I know the food is a rip-off and it’s grease content makes McDonald’s look like a healthy alternative, there is something about fair food that’s too enticing to pass up. Perhaps the slight nausea caused by all the spinning fair rides worked to our advantage though because in the end, Andrew and I only ordered one hamburger, one chili dog, and one basket of sweet potato fries. It was tasty and just as greasy as we expected.

Considering that Windsor is a small town, and that we visited the fair on a weekday, we weren’t surprised by the lack of crowds. The fair workers seemed to be hurting though. Every time we walked passed the game booths they did their utmost to get us to give it a try. Since they were promising us we’d definitely be winners, we decided to check out their prizes. The conversation went something like this:

Andrew: “So what’s the prize we’re guaranteed to win?”
Worker: “A handmade stuffed-animal!”
Andrew: “Handmade in what country?”
Worker: “Handmade in China.”

China produces a lot of quality products, but the “guaranteed win” stuffed animals they pulled out from under the counter were unfortunately not in that category. Something about their lopsided faces pulled at my heartstrings though, so we handed over a five dollar bill for three chances to shoot a cup off a ledge (we missed all three times) and walked away with a guaranteed-win-penguin.

To wrap our day up, we visited the livestock tents. I love animals and had a great time seeing the variety of showy animals that people were raising. My favorite animal of the day was a large black and white turkey that was puffing up and and glaring at everyone who stopped at his cage. I liked his attitude and his beautiful feathers, but Andrew couldn’t get over how ugly the turkey’s face was. Actually, it was a struggle to convince Andrew to put up any of the turkey pictures he took, so what do you think? I really like the defiant look in the turkey’s eyes, daring people to make a comment on his looks.

Windsor Fair in Maine Food Booth

Windsor Fair in Maine Game Booth Windsor Fair in Maine Game Booth Teddy-bears

Windsor Fair in Maine Covered Sheep

Windsor Fair in Maine Slumbering Baby Goat Windsor Fair in Maine Red Roaster

Windsor Fair in Maine Proud Turkey

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9 Responses to Riding it Up at the Windsor Fair in Maine

  1. Sarah December 2, 2011 at 3:39 am #

    love the effects, good job!

  2. Kaz November 23, 2011 at 4:39 am #

    cool effects! love every photos :)

  3. catey November 1, 2011 at 5:35 am #

    I love all of the pics!
    Miss you two!

    • Lori November 1, 2011 at 2:01 pm #

      Thanks Catey! We miss you too!

  4. Charisma October 18, 2011 at 11:22 am #

    cool pics, i love the motion effects…it looks real.

  5. Levinz October 13, 2011 at 7:11 am #

    Excellent Job! I really love what you did on the picture.. The first picture doesn’t look so real.. So glad that you shared this to us! Keep posting some more.. Love to visit here again!

  6. TheOneTrueStickman September 10, 2011 at 4:20 pm #

    Cool motion shots, I like the ones taken from the swings. (Great shot of Lori!)

    The title-shift effect in post mostly works – first reaction was “Wow, that looks neat with a tight DOF!” The transitions do look a bit abrupt to my eye, though maybe that’s the effect you were going for. Not that I’m any sort of expert on tilt-shift, nor one to be overly critical of anyone who spent that much time with the blur tool and/or mask tweaking.

  7. Kris Koeller September 9, 2011 at 10:25 am #

    I like the tilt shift. You’re a braver soul than I for boarding those rides…

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  1. Greasy Food, Games, and Strange Animals: It's the Fair! - September 12, 2011

    [...] our ride tickets had been exhausted, the next step for our day at the Windsor fair was to take a stroll through the food alley. Even though I know the food is a rip-off and [...]

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